Functional Strength Tool Kit – In-Home Workout

Brian Dick

In-home functional strength tool kit with links to purchase through Amazon

Below you will find an excellent starter kit for building functional strength. These tools are best suited for in home use, and for the beginner. The accessory in the bottom left quadrant are pull up balls. These are pull attachments designed by the owner’s of Functional Strength Lab, and you can find other pull up attachments at PullUpLab.com. Below the pictures are a description of each item if you are unfamiliar with the products.

Pull up attachments, pull up balls

  • 45 lb kettlebell (adjust to your strength level)Great full body workout tool when space is limited and equipment is sparse
  • In-door pull-up bar (this was the cheapest for the quality one I found)Pull ups are great compound workouts, and any manipulation of your own body weight leads to increases in functional strength
  • Foam massage rollers (I prefer the longer ones) – A newer trend in fitness, but after personal use, I am a huge proponent. These massage rollers are extremely painful at first, but after 3+ uses the pain subsides and your post-massage feels amazing.
  • Pull-up ball attachments (Build maniacal grip strength – try different sizes and styles) – As mentioned, these were developed by the founder of this very site. Other attachments include egg-shaped, and dowel shaped – which we are calling Pull Up NunChucks. These add ons to the typical pull up bar, or seated row machine, makes an awkward grip with which to build tremendous grip strength.
  • Resistance bands (any will do, just ensure they have heavy enough resistance options) – Like the kettlebell, resistance bands are great for full body workouts when space or equipment are limited. I love throwing these in the bag when I go on vacations/work trips.
  • 75 cm stability ball (may be too big for some) – The stability ball can easily be used as a poor man’s Bosu ball (which commonly run +$80.) This tool is great for full range of motion core exercises and adding instability to normal press workouts or push ups.


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